Fashion X: Transforming the Space

A sewing machine in the middle of a car showroom may seem a little out of the ordinary. But we have never aimed to be ordinary. During four days last week, our Stockholm Space turned into a fashion hub, further showcasing our passion for sustainability and design.

Maja Freiman standing behind a sewing machine with her baby strapped to her chest

Last week’s edition of SFC [Fashion X] STOCKHOLM saw the Polestar Space evolve from a showroom for cars into a hub for fashion. In addition to hosting a panel talk of industry representatives, a repair studio was built in the middle of the Space in collaboration with Swedish design brand Main Nué.

We had the opportunity to sit down with Maja Freiman, the creative force behind the sustainable fashion brand Main Nué. With a passion for clothes that dates to her childhood, she shared her inspiring journey from sewing enthusiast to creating a brand that emphasises sustainability and creativity.

Humour and Craftsmanship: A Unique Blend

Maja's work has been described as a blend of roughness, high precision, and humour, an apt characterisation that resonates with her creative philosophy. Main Nué often incorporates children's textiles, adding a touch of playfulness to the brand. Maja emphasises the importance of not taking oneself too seriously. “I don’t want people to think that I’m too serious. I want to inspire others to dare to do it themselves.”

During the days of the event, visitors were welcome to have their clothes repaired by Maja – or simply consult her on how they themselves can breathe fresh life into their clothes. While different in size and product, Main Nué represents many of the values we at Polestar hold dear, making themselves feel right at home in our Space.

Main Nué stands as a testament to sustainable fashion, a small brand with big ambitions, crafting an eco-friendlier future, one stitch at a time.

Maja Freiman standing infront of a sign inside the Polestar Space which explains the event purpose.
Early Years and Education

Maja's interest in fashion was cultivated at a young age. Growing up an hour north of Stockholm, she began sewing clothes for her dolls, eventually progressing to crafting her own garments during high school. “I’ve always been very interested in clothes. I started sewing clothes for my dolls when I was little,” Maja says with a smile.

Limited by resources, the young designer turned to her mother's wardrobe, discovering a treasure trove of materials that fuelled her creativity. Learning to sew on a machine at the age of eight, Maja's journey in fashion took root early on.

She pursued formal education at the textile school in Borås, graduating in 2016. However, Maja's commitment to sustainability led her away from traditional fashion paths, steering her towards second-hand clothing and upcycling. In essence reusing materials and clothes to create products of higher quality than the original.

Close up of Maja sewing with a needle and string
close up of Maja using a sewing machine on a pair of jeans
The Birth of Main Nué

Maja's commitment to sustainability grew during her studies. She explored repairing clothes as a form of upcycling, a concept that laid the foundation for Main Nué. Collaborating with a fellow student and now ex-cofounder, they embarked on a journey to repurpose discarded materials, salvaging items with defects like holes and stains, giving the clothing items a second life.

Main Nué officially took shape in 2019, and Maja continued her dedication to sustainable fashion, working on personal orders, developing collections, and experimenting with natural colouring techniques. The essence of Main Nué lies in Maja's dedication to sustainability. “I don’t want to contribute to the mountains of wasted clothes I know exist,” Maja notes.

The brand stands against the fast fashion industry, encouraging people to appreciate and extend the life of their existing wardrobe. Maja's use of discarded materials and experimentation with natural colouring techniques reflects a commitment to minimising environmental impact. “We don’t have to buy new clothes. There is so much you can create with what you already have in your wardrobe.”

In that way, the brand is not just a fashion statement but a testament to her belief in minimising waste and encouraging people to cherish and repurpose what they already own.

Three picture collage of a Polestar 2 outside the Space, Maja sitting on a chair, and a guest checking out the products

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